Monday, October 14, 2013

The Fight Against The TV Status Quo Continues

Re-inventing television in the face of the existing TV establishment is a tough task, and the incumbents seem to be finding the law more and more on the side of the status quo.

In the EU TV Catchup has finally given up in its legal tussle with ITV and Channel 5 and withdrawn their streams from its service. this seems to go against other rulings from the EU on this issue and throws into question the concept of a single European market

Considering how much both of those companies are investing in widening their distribution this is a somewhat strange move. Also, it should be noted that TV Catchup has, in my experience, better protection against geospoofing than either of the terrestrial broadcasters' own services.

Meanwhile in the US the arguments over Aereo go on with Cablevision, who won their argument for 'in the cloud DVRs' wading on the side of the innovative micro aerial company, stating in a deposition that broadcasters are trying to stifle innovation. No s**t Sherlock! From accurate ad measurement to distribution, broadcasters are trying to hold on to the status quo in the same way as travel agents and record shops once did.

The TV experience is much better than it once was, but that's largely thanks to innovators such as Netflix, not the traditional broadcasters, with perhaps the honourable exception of Sky. Meanwhile services like YouTube are defining a totally new class of service, but keep on being tempted by the allure of becoming a traditional broadcaster.